Household Income

Absolute Gini Coefficients of Income Inequality

Santa Clara & San Mateo Counties, Bay Area, California, and the United States

Data Sources:

United States Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Analysis:

Jon Haveman

Silicon Valley Institute for Regional Studies

Data are from the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Public Use Microdata. Silicon Valley data include Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties. The Absolutely Gini Coefficient is determined by the product of the Relative Gini and the inflation-adjusted mean household income. The Relative Gini Coefficient indicates the degree to which incomes are concentrated. A Relative Gini of zero corresponds to no concentration, or incomes that are the same across all households. A Relative Gini of 100 indicates that all income is concentrated in a single household. Figures between 0 and 100 indicate proximity to either endpoint. Income data used to calculate the relative Gini Coefficient were inflation-adjusted to 2019 dollars using the Bay Area consumer price index for all urban consumers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for Silicon Valley and Bay Area data, the California consumer price index for all urban consumers from the California Department of Finance May Revision Forecast (April 2020) for California data, and the U.S. city average consumer price index for all urban consumers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Absolute Gini is scaled to equal the Relative Gini in 1990. The Intermediate Gini is the product of the Relative and Absolute Gini Coefficients.

The Absolute Gini is the product of the Relative Gini and the inflation-adjusted mean household income, and has been scaled to equal the Relative Gini in 1990.

Resources for Relevant Data and Reports (show)

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